Genesis Counseling Center
Rape and Sexual Assault: Crisis Intervention

Presented by Trina Young, Psy.D.; Licensed Clinical Psychologist

Presentation Description: 
Immediate intervention is crucial after a person experiences the trauma of a sexual assault or rape.  How can Crisis Responders best help a victim of sexual assault?  What are the immediate needs of the person?  What factors help a person recover?  This presentation will help guide the Crisis Responder to effectively intervene and plan for successful ongoing recovery of the sexual assault victim.

Session Objectives:
At the end of this session, you will:

  1. Develop an understanding of the immediate needs of victims of rape and sexual trauma. 
  2. Understand the psychological effects of rape and sexual assault. 
  3. Understand what factors help a person recover and what is not helpful for recovery.
  4. Know how to facilitate moving the victim from crisis intervention to planning for ongoing recovery.  

Introduction

Rape and sexual assault are incredibly traumatic and soul-distorting.  We know that it is imperative that crisis intervention take place as early as possible for such acts of interpersonal violence. But after such a horrific crime as sexual assault, it is important for the Crisis Responder to know how best to approach the victim and intervene.  Research reveals how the Crisis Responder can be best equipped to minister to victims of rape and sexual trauma.      

Definitions

Helpful Research

Statistics:

Immediate intervention: 

Immediate needs
After a rape, survivors may be openly upset, even hysterical, or they may be numb and seemingly calm. You can help victims by meeting immediate needs:

*One researcher who interviewed 33 rape victims regarding their needs writes:
QUOTE: “While clinicians and researchers are busy trying to determine the most effective approaches and techniques, survivors are concerned about support, validation, kindness, and most of all, empowerment.”  (Drauker, 1999).

Assessing the victim and situation

Stages of the Healing Process:

Planning for ongoing recovery

Conclusion:

Crisis responders are called to be the healing bridge from unspeakable pain to hope.  The victim of sexual trauma has been forced to look evil in the eye, and the Crisis Responder will represent the first glimpse back to sanity in human form.  Be sensitive to listen, hear the pain, and point out the way to hope for the future.  To represent Christ, we must choose and be prepared to be a sanctuary for the hurting.

Soul Care:

Isaiah 53:4-6
Psalm 91:1, 4
Mark 4:35-41 
Mark 13:2-11
John 16:33
I John 5:19-20
Isaiah 45:2-3

Reading List:

Allender, Dan (1995). The Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse.  Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress.

Drauker, C. B. (1999).  The Psychotherapeutic Needs of Women Who Have Been Sexually Assaulted.  Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 35:1, 18-28.

Langberg, Diane (2003). Counseling Survivors of Sexual Abuse.  Longwood, FL: Xulon Press.

Langberg, Diane (1999).  On the Threshold of Hope. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. (2009). Get Info. Retrieved January 20, 2011, from http://www.rainn.org/get-information

References:

AACC’s Stress and Trauma Care training program. (2009).  Forest, VA: American Association of Christian Counselors.

Allender, Dan (1995). The Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse.  Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress.

Borja, S. E., Callahan, J. L., Long, P. J. (2006).  Positive and negative adjustment and social support for sexual assault survivors.  Journal of Traumatic Stress, 19:6, 905-914.

Chopko, B. A. and Schwartz, R. C. (2009).  The relation between mindfulness and posttraumatic growth: A study of first responders to trauma-inducing incidents.  Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 31: 4, 363-376.

Drauker, C. B. (1999).  The Psychotherapeutic Needs of Women Who Have Been Sexually Assaulted.  Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 35:1, 18-28.

Foa, E. B., Keane, T. M. and Friedman (2000). Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.  New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Helping Victims of Sexual Assault. Retrieved January 20, 2011, from http://www.aardvarc.org/rape/about/howhelp.shtml

Hensley (2002). Treatment for rape trauma. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 331-344.

Koss, Mary P. (1993). Rape: Scope, Impact, Interventions, and Public Policy Responses.  American Psychologist, 48: 1062 – 1069.

Langberg, Diane (2003). Counseling Survivors of Sexual Abuse.  Longwood, FL: Xulon Press.

Langberg, Diane (1999).  On the Threshold of Hope. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. (2009). Get Info. Retrieved January 20, 2011, from http://www.rainn.org/get-information

Tedeschi, R. G., Calhoun, L. G. (2004).  Posttraumatic growth: Conceptual foundations and empirical evidence.  Psychological Inquiry, 15, 1-18.

Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. (2005). Action Alliance Newsletters. Retrieved from http://www.vsdvalliance.org/secPublications/newsletters.html